OTF 17.02.15

para o Carnaval

myffotfly.magenta
February 17th – 2015

flying down to rio

otico6fev24
O TICO-TICO (6th of February ’24); cover art: J. Carlos.

Fred Astaire and wing walkers–FLYING DOWN TO RIO (’33)

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o tico-tico almanach ad

O MALHO (11th of January ’30); art: J. Carlos–ad for the 1930 ALMANACH DO O TICO-TICO, featuring Buster Brown [Chiqunho] and his dog, Tige.

o tico-tico

O TICO-TICO was a weekly children’s magazine published in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, and as such the first magazine in Brazil to publish comics.

The magazine began in 1905 and ran until 1977–although, after 1957, it was not a weekly and only published special editions of the the magazine.

In addition to the weekly, O TICO-TICO published an annual ALMANACH that collected popular funnies from the previous year.

Richard Outcault’s Buster Brown was a regular in the periodical–usually at the back of the magazine.  

Outcault had got the name Buster from Buster Keaton–who was at that time a child vaudeville star.

However, in O TICO-TICO, Buster Brown was better known as Chiquinho.

This funny page continued long after the original Outcault series had ended, with Brazilian cartoonists adapting the character for their own stories. 

Chiquinho, O TICO-TICO (8th of November '33).

Chiquinho, O TICO-TICO (8th of November ’33).

Other foreign comics showcased in O TICO-TICO included Mickey Mouse, Krazy Kat, Bringing Up Father and Felix the Cat.

Mickey Mouse & Krazy Kat, O TICO-TICO (23rd of April '30).

Mickey Mouse & Krazy Kat, O TICO-TICO (23rd of April ’30).

Bringing Up Father, O TICO-TICO (6th of February '24);  Felix the Cat, O TICO-TICO (20th of January '32).

Bringing Up Father, O TICO-TICO (6th of February ’24); Felix the Cat, O TICO-TICO (20th of January ’32).

However, the magazine became the place where many Brazilian cartoonists and their creations found a home.

O TICO-TICO (23rd of February '27); O TICO-TICO (8th of November '33); art & story: J. Carlos.

O TICO-TICO (23rd of February ’27); O TICO-TICO (8th of November ’33); art & story: J. Carlos.

O Velho Romao; O Teco-Teco (1st of January '44); art: J. Carlos

O Velho Romao; O Teco-Teco (1st of January ’44); art: J. Carlos

for more on O TICO-TICO  (albeit in Portuguese) visit the Omelette blog: O TICO-TICO COMPLETA 100 ANOS

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TAGARELA (28th of January '04); art & story: J. Carlos

TAGARELA (28th of January ’04); art & story: J. Carlos.

j. carlos

J. Carlos was a prominent artist featured in O TICO-TICO.

José Carlos de Brito e Cunha [b. 18th of July, 1884 – d. 2nd of October, 1950]–known simply as J. Carlos–first saw publication in TAGARELA in 1902.

O MALHO (22nd of December '28); cover art: J. Carlos.

O MALHO (22nd of December ’28); cover art: J. Carlos.

J. Carlos became a regular contributor to TAGARELA, which only lasted two years. But after the demise of that periodical, the illustrator went on to contribute art and cartoons for many Brazilian magazines, including O TICO-TICO, O MALHO, PARA TODOS, FON-FON and CARETA.

His cartoons would satirize public figures in Brazil, but also included several stock characters of his own creation.

A prolific illustrator–producing more than 100,000 cartoons and designs–J. Carlos was adored by the people of Rio de Janeiro.

And the talents of J. Carlos were not limited to comic art as he crafted lyrics for sambas, wrote for vaudeville, created many brilliant designs and sculpted.

A favourite subject of J. Carlos were the local folk of Rio de Janeiro, collectively known as carioca.

FON-FON (date unknown); cover art: J. Carlos--this Carnival cover features the typical carioca characters of J. Carlos.

FON-FON (date unknown); cover art: J. Carlos–this Carnival cover features the typical carioca characters of J. Carlos.

The art deco style of J. Carlos was also a strong influence on fashion in early 20th century Brazil.

O MALHO (4th of February '28); O MALHO (6th of  February '29); O MALHO (11th of January '30)--ads for PARA TODOS featuring art by J. Carlos.

O MALHO (4th of February ’28); O MALHO (6th of
February ’29); O MALHO (11th of January ’30)–ads for PARA TODOS featuring art by J. Carlos.

PARA TODOS (24th of April '26); PARA TODOS (6th of Septembr '30); art: J. Carlos.

PARA TODOS (24th of April ’26); PARA TODOS (6th of Septembr ’30); art: J. Carlos.

for more PARA TODOS art by J. Carlos (albeit in Portuguese) visit: REVISTA PARA TODOS – J. Carlos

for more on the career of J. Carlos (albeit in Portuguese) visit: J. CARLOS EM REVISTA

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josé carioca

In ’41, Walt Disney took a team of his company’s talented men and women on a good will tour of Latin America, where they absorbed many ideas for future film projects.

In Brazil, Disney invited J. Carlos to come to Hollywood. That never happened; however, a drawing of a parrot by the artist gave the Disney team the idea for José Carioca [Joe Carioca], who was first featured in the animated anthology SALUDOS AMIGOS (’42)–in its fourth and final part, Aquarela do Brasil:

The whole Disney good will tour is chronicled in SOUTH OF THE BORDER WITH DISNEY: 
part one & part two

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o carnaval

Of course, Rio de Janeiro is famous for its Carnaval. And in O TICO-TICO, there were often ideas for masks and costumes for children to wear.

O TICO-TICO (3rd of February '26); O TICO-TICO (20th of Janary '32); O TICO-TICO (1st of January '44).

O TICO-TICO (3rd of February ’26); O TICO-TICO (20th of Janary ’32); O TICO-TICO (1st of January ’44).

O TICO-TICO (20th of February '24).

O TICO-TICO (20th of February ’24).

The costumes for Carnaval clearly changed over time. Perhaps not as outrageous as the costumes of today, yet still quite provoactive.

O MALHO (16th of February '29).

O MALHO (16th of February ’29).

O MALHO (16th of February '29).

O MALHO (16th of February ’29).

visit the website for the 2015 Rio Carnival: THE 2015 RIO CARNIVAL GUIDE – http://rio-carnival.net

Rio Sambodromo

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orfeu negro

The 1959 movie, ORFEU NEGRO [Black Orpheus] is set during Carnaval in a favela of Rio de Janeiro. The story is a modern version of the Orpheus myth. The frenzied samba beats and explosion of Brazilian style set the world on its ear.

The international success of Marcel Camus’ movie elevated the profile of Rio’s Carnaval.

ORFEU NEGRO (’59), final scene:


myff8days.violet

. . . looking for someone who lost their glass slipper at the Grand Ball? There’s plenty of costumed candidates in the third week of February . . .

Lois Lane is miffed when she is not chosen to be the Bride of Superman in ACTION COMICS 143 (April ’50)–story by William Woolfolk, art by Al Plastino–save the date for February 15 ’50.

On February 17 ’50, the sinister Dr. Doom exposes the Bat-Cave’s Thousand and One Trophies of Batman, in DETECTIVE COMICS 158 (April ’50)–story by Edmond Hamilton; art by Bob Kane and Charles Paris; cover by Win Mortimer.

Ladies and Gentlemen, presenting Miss Jimmy Olsen [shown below as reprinted in SUPERMAN’S PAL, JIMMY OLSEN No. 95]. The Cub Reporter attracts cat calls and wolf whistles when he comes out as a dame in the hilarious latest issue of SUPERMAN’S PAL, JIMMY OLSEN 44 (April ’60), available February 18 ’60. Also in this issue, Jimmy turns into a wolf-man.

Curt/Stan Miss Jimmy

Flash106-00What is that eerie sound? It’s an irresistable summons to make tracks on February 19 ’59 to your local newsstand, as the Scarlet Speedster encounters the Pied Piper of Peril in THE FLASH 106 (April-May ’59); cover art: Carmine Infantino & Joe Giella.

In THE MARVEL FAMILY 22 (April ’48), on February 20 ’48, the Marvels face the Triple Threat. And in another tale, Captain Marvel vs. the Radioactive Man.

The Robot Cop of Gotham City fights alongside the Dynamic Duo in BATMAN 70 (April-May ’52), at your neighbourhood newsdealer February 20 ’52–don’t be late.

FourColor272On sale February 21 ’50, Dell’s FOUR COLOR 272 presents an adaptation of Walt Disney’s CINDERELLA. [See more about this at AS YOU LIKE IT.]

On February 21 ’51, DC releases the first issue of MYSTERY IN SPACE (April-May ’51), from science fiction editor Julius Schwartz, featuring the Knights of the Galaxy; cover art: Carmine Infantino & Frank Giacoia.

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. . .  and one giant leap for the last week in February  . . .

STRANGE ADVENTURES 67 (April '56), cover by Gil Kane and Joe Giella.

STRANGE ADVENTURES 67 (April ’56), cover by Gil Kane and Joe Giella.

S&S0101Demand Classics for February 23 ’56: The Martian Masquerade–by Broome/Kane/Giella–STRANGE ADVENTURES 67 (April ’56) breaks the fourth wall of the editor’s office (see OTF 12.11.13). Sheldon Mayer introduces his baby-talking toddlers in the first issue of SUGAR AND SPIKE (April-May ’56); cover by Mayer.


buccaneers21On newsstands February 24 ’50, BUCCANEERS 21 (May ’50) features a stand-out cover by Reed Crandall.

The title that fostered DC’s name DETECTIVE COMICS No. 1 (March ’37) debuts on February 25 ’37.

February 25 ’44, DAREDEVIL COMICS 24 (May ’44). A modern Bonnie and Clyde, Punch and Judy are headed on a murderous crime spree, before Daredevil and the Little Wise Guys exact rough justice–story by Charles Biro, art by Norman Mauer. And this issue is cut down from 48 inside pages from the former 56, due to paper rationing for the war effort–as explained on the inside front cover.

daredevil24.inside

February 27 ’48. Dell’s FOUR COLOR 186 adapts the classic animated feature from Walt Disney, BAMBI–with a script adapted by Chase Craig from Felix Salten’s story and art by Morris Gollub. The movie was first released August 13 ’42; however this is the first Dell adaptation of the actual film–a previous issue of FOUR COLOR (No. 30, on sale August 31 ’43) featured Bambi’s Children.

On sale February 27 ’58. The Legion of Super-Heroes. ADVENTURE COMICS 247 (April ’58). ‘Nough said.

At newsstands on February 27 ’64:  When their memebers are trapped inside the citadel on Thoon, the 30th century teens send in their own “Suicide Squad” to extract them–and the Legion of Substitute play a key role–in this epic issue of ADVENTURE COMICS 319 (April ’64). Story by Edmond Hamilton, art by John Forte, cover by Swan and Moldoff. And DETECTIVE COMICS 326 (April ’64) features the 300th appearance of Batman in that title and is the last issue to feature the Old Look Dynamic Duo–next issue a New Look begins. It’s also the last appearance for John Jones (by Jack Miller and Joe Certa) who dies in this issue (or so it appears), as the Martian Manhunter’s feature moves over to HOUSE OF MYSTERY along with outgoing editor Jack Schiff. Cover art by Sheldon Moldoff.

DETECTIVE COMICS 326

Coming out February 29 ’52, it’s a leap day for DOLL MAN and Doll Girl in the June ’52 issue (No. 40)–with a classic cover by Reed Crandall.dollman40

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